Random People

Shortlist 2016

Sergei Stroitelev

Sergei Stroitelev is an independent documentary photographer from Saint-Petersburg, Russia, who regularly works with National Geographic Russia, Vice UK/USA. He also works with RIA Novosti and Kommersant Photos as a stringer. Sergei worked as a human rights lawyer for three years before becoming a photographer. During that time, he dreamt of fieldwork instead of doing paperwork, and documentary photography happened to be the best tool for it. In 2013-2014, Sergei spent ten months in Asia cooperating with non-governmental structures and organizations such as Red Cross Nepal and Nepal Leprosy Trust. He focused on human rights issues in the country - children with HIV, discrimination of people suffering from leprosy, and drug addiction. At the moment, Stroitelev is interested in social issues such as gender/racial prejudice, discrimination of HIV-positive people, migration, the aftermath of conflicts and natural disasters, which he explores using various visual languages. Sergei prefers to work in regions vulnerable to human rights violations, including his home country and countries of Southeast Asia such as Nepal, India and Bangladesh. Stroitelev believes that a well-executed documentary project is the best instrument for raising awareness about social issues, which is missing in those regions.

The Conflict
2016

Random People

Shortly before the Second World War, the fascist regime established hundreds of industrial complexes to kill people. During the war, Jews from all over Europe and the prisoners of war were sent there. Also one of the other symbols of the Nazi ideology of hatred became ghettos - special areas around European cities with inhuman living conditions, organized specially for the Jews. The exact number of deaths from starvation, medical experimentation, executions in concentration camps and ghettos has been unknown to this day. It could reach 6 million. People who went through this hell as children again dive into these horrific memories, calling themselves «random people» who survived by chance.